What (and where) to plant.

The greatest challenge to planting a tree is deciding which tree. The old adage, "right tree, right place" is a good reminder that the number one reason that trees are taken down before their full maturity is that they were planted where they outgrow their space. Understanding the growth habit and mature size of the tree you are considering should be the foundation of your tree selection process.

 

Our tree catalog contains information on the mature size and growth rates for our most popular trees. If you can’t find what you’re looking for there, send us an email. We’re happy to help you select trees based on the soil conditions and available space in your landscape to ensure the greatest longevity for your project.

 

When to plant.

You’ve probably heard that fall is the time to plant trees and shrubs. Although trees are planted nearly year-round in the Pacific Northwest, the advantage in fall is that it is the beginning of a sustained period of cool, moist weather. Trees planted in autumn will begin to generate new root growth in the moderate soil temperature and will have a head-start during the first warm days of February and March over trees that are planted later in the Spring.

 

Tree farmers harvest their trees beginning in late October or even late November after the leaves have fallen and the nighttime temperatures have dropped. For larger trees or for larger quantities of matched trees, the best inventory selection is during the winter months. Here in the Puget Sound region, planting can take place anytime that the ground is not frozen, which is nearly never.

 

How to plant.

Trees that are properly planted will be more vigorous and able to resist diseases or pests that like to attack trees that are stressed from being planted improperly. Never plant a tree or shrub so deeply that you bury the flair of the root collar. It’s also a good idea to amend the soil with compost or a good organic mulch. Water the new tree or shrub to help settle the soil and to give the roots moist soil to grow into.  

 

For more tips on proper planting and maintenance, check out our video series.

 

More questions? Get in touch

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